The effect of Ti on the Kinetics of Phosphorous Removal during BOF Steelmaking

The effect of Ti on the Kinetics of Phosphorous Removal during BOF Steelmaking

Utilisation of iron ores (ironsands) with higher Ti content has prompted this BOF-based investigation into the effects of Ti on the removal of P from steel. A specific focus will be to separate the effects of Ti on the physical properties of the slag and the chemistry of phosphorous transfer from steel to slag.  From a plant perspective, the thermodynamic and kinetic data obtained from high-temperature experiments will be incorporated into a) an operational model that accurately predicts the steel’s final phosphorous composition enabling a reduction in overall heat-to-heat time and increased productivity of the existing plant, and b) a flux usage model to optimize flux usage, plant practices and incoming phosphorous loads reducing the overall cost of converting iron ores into steel.

This research will provide a fundamental understanding of the effects of retained slag practice on Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF) refractory wear. BOF steelmaking remains the predominant process worldwide. While there has been much work carried out on the effects of BOS slag composition on carbon-bonded magnesia refractories there has been little that has dealt with the specifics of retained slag practice on refractory wear.

This project began in November 2017, expected completion August-September 2019

Funding provided by Westpac Banking Group

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3 PhD Students and 25 PostDoc Fellows

Status

Ongoing Project due for completion 2019

Principal Lead

Professor Brian Monaghan

Professor Brian Monaghan

Professor Brian Monaghan has been an active lecturer and researcher in materials engineering at the University of Wollongong (UOW) for more than 10 years.He is a pyrometallurgist who believes passionately that if the sustainability, energy, and greenhouse gas challenges currently facing the planet are to be addressed, we need strong engagement from the engineering and scientific communities. His expertise lies in the kinetics and thermodynamics of high temperature metals processing. He is the Director of the Engineering Materials Strength at UOW as well as leader of the UOW PYRO Group.Within the Steel Research Hub (SRH), he is a member of the Research Management Committee, providing leadership to the Sustainable Steel Manufacturing Program, as well as being actively involved in several projects, including:

  • Obtaining Value from Steel Plant Waste
  • The effect of Ti on the kinetics of phosphorous removal during BOS steelmaking
  • Effect of Retained BOS Slag on Refractory Wear
  • The Effects of Minerals on Coke Structure
    The Kinetics of Coke Analogue Reactivity
  • 3D Characterization of Coke
  • Gaseous Iron Reduction
  • Effect of Slag Structure on Interfacial Tension
  • Phosphorous Partitioning in Slags
  • CaO/Al2O3 Ratio Effects on Interfacial Tension of Slags
  • Evaluation of the Productivity Limits in the Blast Furnace Lower Zone

Researchers

Dr Sheng Chew

Dr Sheng Chew

Dr Sheng Chew is a Senior Technology & Development Engineer in BlueScope Iron & Steelmaking Technology with postgraduate technical and business qualifications. He has over 20 years’ experience in the steel industry covering the primary operations value chain from raw materials through to secondary steelmaking. Throughout this time he has continued to support and participate in collaborative research.

As Program Leader (Industry) in the Sustainable Steel Manufacturing program of the Steel Research Hub, Dr Chew provides both business and research vision and leadership.

Michael Chapman

Michael Chapman

Dr Guangqing Zhang

Dr Guangqing Zhang

Andrew Jacobs

Andrew Jacobs

Mr Phillip Drain

Mr Phillip Drain

Mr Phillip Drain completed his B.E (materials) at the University of Wollongong in 2010 as part of the BlueScope cadet program. He worked as a Process Engineer at Worsley Alumina from 2011-2014 and completed a M.E (Research) in 2013 with the University of Wollongong.

He started his PhD studies in early 2015 with the Steel Research Hub at the University of Wollongong. His research interests are sustainable steel manufacturing and minerals processing, recycling minerals processing waste and by-products.

Dr Raymond Longbottom

Dr Raymond Longbottom

Dr. Raymond Longbottom has been a Research Fellow at the University of Wollongong since 2008 and within the Steel Research Hub since 2015. He studied at UNSW and completed his B.Met.E. in 2000, and his PhD in 2005. Before coming to UOW, he worked at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) as part of the EU-funded Ultra-Low CO2 Steel (ULCOS) project. His interests lie in sustainable iron and steelmaking, in both conventional and alternative processing. Dr Raymond Longbottom brings to the hub 16 years’ experience in iron and steelmaking research.

In his current project on recycling steel plant by-products, he hopes to help with the development of (environmental and economically) sustainable practices and utilisation of materials in steelmaking.

Ms Ai Thi Diem Nguyen

Ms Ai Thi Diem Nguyen

Ms Ai Thi Diem Nguyen completed her Master of Science in Ferrous Technology in Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology Vietnam. She then completed her Bachelor of Engineering in Materials Technology – Silicate Materials Technology at the Pohang University of Science and Technology, South Korea.

She is studying for a PhD in materials technology within the Steel Research Hub at the University of Wollongong. Her research interests stem from her desire to understand fundamental aspects of ferrous technology. Her current research focuses on the interaction between Basic Oxygen Steelmaking (BOS) slag and refractories with the aim to understand the effects of retained slag on BOS refractory wear. Her research motivation is to contribute to the improvement of resistance of MgO-based refractory to slag corrosion in BOS.

Dr Raymond Longbottom

Dr Raymond Longbottom

Dr. Raymond Longbottom has been a Research Fellow at the University of Wollongong since 2008 and within the Steel Research Hub since 2015. He studied at UNSW and completed his B.Met.E. in 2000, and his PhD in 2005. Before coming to UOW, he worked at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) as part of the EU-funded Ultra-Low CO2 Steel (ULCOS) project. His interests lie in sustainable iron and steelmaking, in both conventional and alternative processing. Dr Raymond Longbottom brings to the hub 16 years’ experience in iron and steelmaking research.

In his current project on recycling steel plant by-products, he hopes to help with the development of (environmental and economically) sustainable practices and utilisation of materials in steelmaking.