Development of a Fundamental Particle Scale Approach to Modelling Blast Furnace Charging Phenomena

Development of a Fundamental Particle Scale Approach to Modelling Blast Furnace Charging Phenomena

Ironmaking blast furnaces are typically charged with alternating layers of granular coke and ferrous materials using a rotating chute to distribute materials circumferentially around the furnace throat. Although rotating chute designs offer a significant degree of control, there are many phenomena where an operator has only limited ability to control the fundamental granular behaviours that impact the final distribution. Simple empirical rotating chute models have been developed by considering simple stream trajectory calculation and volume filling/slope stability formulations. However, they require significant effort in measuring the parameters that describe these phenomena.

Discrete particle simulation is well situated to provide a deeper understanding of burden distribution in a blast furnace. Development of the next generation of blast furnace distribution model can provide the step change in control needed to take advantage of the modern multicomponent burden composition. The project will deliver a model for offline use as a burden distribution planning and evaluation tool to enhance the decision making capability of blast furnace engineers.

Ironmaking blast furnaces are typically charged with alternating layers of granular coke and ferrous materials using a rotating chute to distribute materials circumferentially around the furnace throat. Although rotating chute designs offer a significant degree of control, there are many phenomena where an operator has only limited ability to control the fundamental granular behaviours that impact the final distribution. Simple empirical rotating chute models have been developed by considering simple stream trajectory calculation and volume filling/slope stability formulations. However, they require significant effort in measuring the parameters that describe these phenomena. Discrete particle simulation is well situated to provide a deeper understanding of burden distribution in a blast furnace. Development of the next generation of blast furnace distribution model can provide the step change in control needed to take advantage of the modern multicomponent burden composition. The project will deliver a model for offline use as a burden distribution planning and evaluation tool to enhance the decision making capability of blast furnace engineers.

Start date: 1/8/2017 End date: 31/7/2020

Development of the next generation of blast furnace distribution model can provide the step change in control needed to take advantage of the modern multicomponent burden composition. The project will deliver a model for offline use as a burden distribution planning and evaluation tool to enhance the decision making capability of blast furnace engineers.

The project will deliver a model for offline use as a burden distribution planning and evaluation tool. This model will enhance the decision making capability of the blast furnace engineers in the coming years.

3 PhD Students and 25 PostDoc Fellows

Status

Ongoing Project due for completion 2019

Principal Lead

Dr Zongyan Zhou

Dr Zongyan Zhou

Dr. Zongyan Zhou received his BEng (1996) and MEng (2000) from Northeastern University (China), and PhD (2007) from UNSW Australia. Then he was an Australian Postdoctoral Fellow Industry (2007-2010), then lecturer (2011- ) in the School of Material Science and Engineering, UNSW. His research expertise related to the Hub include transport phenomena in process metallurgy, blast furnace burden distribution and multiphase flow and heat transfer modelling, and granular dynamics.

Researchers

Dr David Pinson

Dr David Pinson

Dr David Pinson is a Senior Technology and Development Engineer, Iron & Steelmaking Technology at BlueScope. He received his PhD from the University of NSW in 1999 and was a postdoctoral fellow before joining BHP Steel in 2003.

He has maintained active research links with the academic community throughout his industrial career. Now working in a plant technology role, his ongoing research interests include particle transport phenomena and modelling, multiphase flow and heat transfer, signal analysis, blast furnace and iron ore sintering fundamentals, as well as the increasing importance of energy efficiency and by-products reprocessing. Dr David Pinson has extensive experience managing collaborative industrial research projects, especially where undergraduate and postgraduate students work for some or all of their time in an industrial environment. This experience has shown the value of targeted industrial-academic combined projects and is well aligned to the overall goals of the industrial transformation hubs program.

Within the Steel Research Hub, he hopes that the longer term stability of funding allows a succussion of high value projects to deliver tangible industrial process improvements which can improve the Australian steelmaking sector’s economic and environmental sustainability.

Dr Sheng Chew

Dr Sheng Chew

Dr Sheng Chew is a Senior Technology & Development Engineer in BlueScope Iron & Steelmaking Technology with postgraduate technical and business qualifications. He has over 20 years’ experience in the steel industry covering the primary operations value chain from raw materials through to secondary steelmaking. Throughout this time he has continued to support and participate in collaborative research.

As Program Leader (Industry) in the Sustainable Steel Manufacturing program of the Steel Research Hub, Dr Chew provides both business and research vision and leadership.

Yinxuan Qiu

Yinxuan Qiu